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Child going through potty training

Potty Training for Baby Boys and Girls

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After at least a year and a half of changing diapers, it’s time for your child to take charge of their own poo. Or rather, get ready for some fun potty training. Here are some tips to help you start potty training for your child.

28/10/2016 - 13:09

After at least a year and a half of changing diapers, it’s time for your child to take charge of their own poo. Or rather, get ready for some fun potty training. Here are some tips to help you start potty training for your child.


1. Understand Your Child

Every child is different; your child may not be ready for potty training at the same time as others, and it’s best to follow his or her pace. By at least age one and a half, your child may be able to tell when he or she has a full bowel. Here are a few signs that your child may be ready for potty training:

  • Your child stays dry for longer than two hours or more
  • Your child is able to communicate when he or she feels like peeing or pooping
  • Your child can sit on a potty, and stand when he or she is done
  • Your child knows when he or she needs a change of diapers


Most parents start their child’s potty training at the age of two and a half. However, do remember that each child starts at a different age; for example girls may be ready a little sooner than the boys. You can’t force your child to go to the loo; this will probably only create stress for your child.


2. Get Ready to Teach

Here’s how you can start potty training for your child.

  1. Firstly, you’ll need the right equipment. Your own adult toilet is obviously too big for your child; invest in a child’s potty chair. If your child is grown enough, get him or her to pick a potty chair; and decorate it if he or she wants to.
  2. Next, try to get your child talking. Teach your child how to communicate when he or she has to go.
  3. Then, it’s time to explain what the potty chair is for. Show by example; you can use toys, or throw dirty tissues inside the potty chair. Place the potty chair in the bathroom to help create association between pooping or peeing with the bathroom.
  4. As your child is more likely to poop after a meal, get him or her to sit on the potty chair after eating.
  5. If your child is taking a while, keep him or her entertained with a story or some music.


3. Potty Training for Boys

  • Have him learn how to pee sitting in the potty chair first before learning how to stand and aim.
  • Teach him to push his penis down to avoid scraping on the splash guard.
  • When he is ready to try standing to pee, teach him how to aim and to clean his penis.


4. Potty Training for Girls

  • Let her watch you and learn how to sit and pee; children learn best by example
  • Teach her how to wash it or wipe from front to back when cleaning up.


The most important tip for all new parents is to have patience. You might have a few messes and misses along the way, so you may have to get down and dirty literally. As your child is still learning a new skill, it’ll take a while before he or she is comfortable with the potty chair, and in the long term, the toilet. Anytime you feel frustrated, take a deep breath (not near the potty chair), and start again. Soon enough, you’ll have your child pooping comfortably and on his or her own.

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